RIT on Quantum Information Archives for Academic Year 2016


Quantum Probabilities I: Gleason's Theorem

When: Mon, September 19, 2016 - 4:15pm
Where: CSS 3100A
Speaker: Brad Lackey (University of Maryland) - http://quics.umd.edu/people/brad-lackey
Abstract: I will introduce the basic mathematical structure behind quantum events and give a proof of a simplified version of Gleason's theorem, as presented in http://arxiv.org/abs/quant-ph/0205039 .

Quantum Probabilities II: Gleason's Theorem (cont'd.)

When: Mon, September 26, 2016 - 4:15pm
Where: CSS 3100A
Speaker: Brad Lackey (University of Maryland) - http://quics.umd.edu/people/brad-lackey
Abstract: We will continue our survey of the basic mathematical structure behind quantum probabilities, introducing the concept of effects, leading to a proof of a simplified version of Gleason's theorem, as presented in http://arxiv.org/abs/quant-ph/0205039 .

Tensor products and entanglement

When: Mon, October 3, 2016 - 4:15pm
Where: CSS 3100A
Speaker: Brad Lackey (University of Maryland) -
Abstract: We will continue our discussion of the paper http://arxiv.org/abs/quant-ph/0205039, with the derivation of the tensor product rule in quantum theory.

Quantum measurement and Bayes' rule

When: Mon, October 10, 2016 - 4:15pm
Where: CSS 3100A
Speaker: Brad Lackey (University of Maryland) -
Abstract: We will finish our discussion of the paper http://arxiv.org/abs/quant-ph/0205039, with a discussion of measurement of quantum systems and its relationship to Bayes' rule.

Quantum rigidity and multiplayer games

When: Mon, October 17, 2016 - 4:15pm
Where: CSS 3100A
Speaker: Carl Miller (University of Maryland) - http://www.umiacs.umd.edu/~camiller/
Abstract: Rigidity (also known as self-testing) expresses the idea that states and measurements can sometimes be deduced from their effects. I will present the mathematics behind this idea, using the magic square game (https://arxiv.org/abs/1512.02074) as an example.

Quantum rigidity and multiplayer games (cont'd)

When: Mon, October 31, 2016 - 4:15pm
Where: CSS 3100A
Speaker: Carl Miller (University of Maryland) - http://www.umiacs.umd.edu/~camiller
Abstract: This is the second part of a two-part lecture. Rigidity (also known as self-testing) expresses the idea that states and measurements can sometimes be deduced from their effects. I will present the mathematics behind this idea, using the magic square game (https://arxiv.org/abs/1512.02074) as an example.

Informational derivation of quantum theory

When: Mon, November 7, 2016 - 4:15pm
Where: CSS 3100A
Speaker: Brad Lackey (University of Maryland) -
Abstract: We start our discussion of the "operational approach" to foundations of quantum theory as presented in Chiribella, D'Ariano, and Perinotti, http://journals.aps.org/pra/abstract/10.1103/PhysRevA.84.012311.

Informational derivation of quantum theory (cont'd)

When: Mon, November 14, 2016 - 4:15pm
Where: CSS 3100A
Speaker: Brad Lackey (University of Maryland) -
Abstract: We continue our discussion and analysis of the "operational approach" to foundations of quantum theory as presented in Chiribella, D'Ariano, and Perinotti, http://journals.aps.org/pra/abstract/10.1103/PhysRevA.84.012311.

Informational derivation of quantum theory

When: Mon, November 28, 2016 - 4:15pm
Where: CSS 3100A
Speaker: Brad Lackey (University of Maryland) -
Abstract: We continue our discussion and analysis of the "operational approach" to foundations of quantum theory as presented in Chiribella, D'Ariano, and Perinotti, http://journals.aps.org/pra/abstract/10.1103/PhysRevA.84.012311.

Nonlocal XOR games for quantum players

When: Mon, December 5, 2016 - 4:15pm
Where: CSS 3100A
Speaker: Carl Miller (University of Maryland) - http://www.umiacs.umd.edu/~camiller
Abstract: I will discuss how to calculate the optimal score for two-player XOR games via arrangements of real vectors. This is a method attributed to Boris Tsirelson.

Simulation of partially trusted measurements

When: Mon, December 12, 2016 - 4:15pm
Where: CSS 3100A
Speaker: Carl Miller (University of Maryland) - http://www.umiacs.umd.edu/~camiller
Abstract: I will discuss how unknown quantum measurements can be used to simulate partially trusted measurements. This approach, which is related to the notion of rigidity, has been useful in quantum cryptography ( https://arxiv.org/abs/1402.0489 ).