Special Lecture Archives for Academic Year 2018


Topics in the Nonlinear Schrodinger Equation - Lecture Series (JHU)

When: Fri, February 2, 2018 - 2:00pm
Where: Room 1313 Kirwan Hall
Speaker: Benjamin Dodson
Organizer: Matei Machedon

Topics in the Nonlinear Schrodinger Equation - Lecture Series (JHU)

When: Fri, February 9, 2018 - 2:00pm
Where: Room 1313 Kirwan Hall
Speaker: Benjamin Dodson
Organizer: Matei Machedon

Topics in the Nonlinear Schrodinger Equation - Lecture Series (JHU)

When: Fri, February 16, 2018 - 2:00pm
Where: Room 1313 Kirwan Hall
Speaker: Benjamin Dodson
Organizer: Matei Machedon

Topics in the Nonlinear Schrodinger Equation - Lecture Series (JHU)

When: Fri, February 23, 2018 - 2:00pm
Where: Room 1313 Kirwan Hall
Speaker: Benjamin Dodson
Organizer: Matei Machedon

Data-driven multiscale modeling of cell fate dynamics

When: Thu, March 15, 2018 - 2:00pm
Where: Kirwan Hall 3206
Speaker: Qing Nie (University of California, Irvine) -
Abstract: Cells make fate decisions in response to different and dynamic environmental and pathological stimuli. Recent technological breakthroughs have enabled biologists to gather data in previously unthinkable quantities at single cell level. However, synthesizing and analyzing such data require new mathematical and computational tools, and in particular, understanding multiscale cellular dynamics emerging from molecular and genomic scale details demands new multiscale modeling. In this talk, I will present our recent works on analyzing single-cell molecular data, and their connections with cellular and spatial tissue dynamics. Our mathematical approaches bring together optimization, statistical physics, ODEs/PDEs, and stochastic simulations along with machine learning techniques. By utilizing our novel mathematical methods and their integration with new datasets from our collaborators, we are able to investigate several complex systems during development and regeneration to uncover new mechanisms, such as novel beneficial roles of noise and intermediate cellular states, in cell fate determination.

Advancing Data Assimilation as a Science Hub

When: Thu, March 15, 2018 - 3:30pm
Where: ATL (Formerly Computer and Space Sciences, CSS) 2400
Speaker: Dr. Takemasa Miyoshi ( RIKEN Advanced Institute for Computational Science, Kobe, Japan ) - http://data-assimilation.riken.jp/~miyoshi/
Abstract: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1gZIxccWtOHU43RrlPm2sRJb0TLt1fqKIPgNxH3UH_FE/edit?usp=sharing

2018 Kirwan Undergraduate Lecture: The Geometry of Redistricting

When: Fri, April 27, 2018 - 3:30pm
Where: Kirwan Hall 3206
Speaker: Jordan Ellenberg (University of Wisconsin) - http://www.math.wisc.edu/~ellenber/
Abstract: One of the most closely watched Supreme Court cases this year is also one of the most mathematical — Gill v. Whitford, a case about whether the state legislative districts in Wisconsin were drawn to favor Republicans so greatly that the right of Wisconsin Democrats to representation in the legislature was unconstitutionally diminished. The court will also hear a companion case, Benisek v. Lamone, concerning congressional districts in Maryland, which are drawn to favor Democrats. As a native of Maryland, a current resident of Wisconsin, and a mathematician, I’m naturally following this closely. How can we use mathematics to test whether district boundaries are drawn to favor one party or the other? How much unfairness is too much? And how can people with mathematical, statistical, and computational training participate in the process and help us get to a point where the legal status quo has good mathematical grounding?

Dynamic control: Long time, numerics, constraints and greedy methods.

When: Wed, May 2, 2018 - 10:45am
Where: Kirwan Hall 3206
Speaker: Enrique Zuazua (Universidad Autónoma de Madrid) - http://verso.mat.uam.es/web/ezuazua/zuazua.html


Aggregation-Diffusion and Kinetic PDEs for collective behavior: applications in the sciences

When: Fri, May 11, 2018 - 3:15pm
Where: Kirwan Hall 3206
Speaker: Jose Antonio Carrillo de la Plata (Imperial College, London) - http://wwwf.imperial.ac.uk/~jcarrill/
Abstract: I will present a survey of micro, meso and macroscopic models where repulsion and attraction effects are included through pairwise potentials. I will discuss their interesting mathematical features and applications in mathematical biology and engineering. Qualitative properties of local minimizers of the interaction energies are crucial in order to understand these complex behaviors. I will showcase the breadth of possible applications with three different phenomena in applications: segregation, phase transitions and consensus.

Vanishing Vector-Valued Logarithmic Residues and Unusual Cantor Sets By Harm Bart, Erasmus University, Rotterdam, The Netherlands

When: Wed, May 23, 2018 - 2:00pm
Where:

Location: Kirwan Hall 1313
A basic result from complex function theory states that the logarithmic residue (i.e., the contour
integral of the logarithmic derivative) of a scalar analytic function can only vanish when the
function has no zeros inside the contour. Question: Does this result generalize to the vector-
valued case? Assuming that the functions in question take values in a complete normed linear
algebra, the answer can vary. Positive results have been obtained for large classes of such
algebras, among them the commutative (more generally, the polynomial identity) ones. There is
a close connection between logarithmic residues and sums of idempotents. Pursuing this
connection, negative answers to the above question have come up via the construction of non-
trivial zero sums of a finite number of idempotents. It is intriguing that only five idempotents are
needed in all known examples. The idempotent constructions relate to deep problems concerning
the geometry of Banach spaces and general topology. In particular, a novel approach to the
construction of Cantor type sets plays a role. The talk should be accessible to non-specialists.
The talk reports on joint work with Torsten Ehrhardt (Santa Cruz, California) and Bernd
Silbermann (Chemnitz, Germany).