Organizers: Patrick Brosnan, Sandra Cerrai, and Vadim Kaloshin
When: 
Wednesday @ 3:15pm, 2:45pm Tea in 3201
Where:
Math 3206
From time to time special colloquia are held on other days, sometimes as part of conferences.
Other special colloquia are the Aziz Lectures and Avron Douglis Memorial Lectures.

  • TBA


    Speaker: Iosif Polterovich (Université de Montréal) - http://www.dms.umontreal.ca/~iossif/

    When: Wed, April 27, 2016 - 3:15pm
    Where: Math3206
  • Aziz Lecture


    When: Wed, November 18, 2015 - 6:15pm
    Where:
  • TBA (Aziz Lecture)


    Speaker: Wolfgang Dahmen (Aachen University, Germany) - https://www.igpm.rwth-aachen.de/personen/dahmen

    When: Wed, November 18, 2015 - 3:15pm
    Where: Math 3206
  • Arinkin TBA


    Speaker: Dima Arinkin (University of Wisconsin) - http://www.math.wisc.edu/~arinkin/

    When: Wed, November 11, 2015 - 3:15pm
    Where: 3206.0

    View Abstract

    Abstract: TBA
  • John Horvath remembrance event


    Speaker: Hold Date () -

    When: Wed, November 4, 2015 - 3:15pm
    Where: Math 3206
  • No Colloquium


    Speaker: No Colloquium () -

    When: Fri, October 30, 2015 - 3:15pm
    Where: Math 3206
  • No Seminar


    Speaker: No Seminar () -

    When: Wed, October 28, 2015 - 3:15pm
    Where: Math 3206
  • No Seminar


    Speaker: No Seminar () -

    When: Wed, October 21, 2015 - 3:15pm
    Where: Math 3206
  • Stefan Gille (TBA)


    Speaker: Stefan Gille (Alberta) -

    When: Wed, October 14, 2015 - 3:15pm
    Where: Math 3206

    View Abstract

    Abstract: TBA
  • TBA


    Speaker: Samir Khuller (University of Maryland) - https://www.cs.umd.edu/users/samir/

    When: Wed, September 23, 2015 - 3:15pm
    Where: Math 3206
  • Galileo's New Mathematics


    Speaker: Mark A. Peterson (Mount Holyoke University) - https://www.mtholyoke.edu/acad/facultyprofiles/mark_peterson

    When: Wed, September 16, 2015 - 3:15pm
    Where: Math 3206

    View Abstract

    Abstract: Galileo isn't really remembered for his mathematics.
    There is nothing called "Galileo's Theorem," for instance.
    But Galileo did make a fundamental contribution to mathematics,
    arguably more important than any new theorem, namely a new (or re-discovered)
    conception of what mathematics could mean. In the decades before
    Galileo, higher mathematics was an essentially static and obscure
    corner of philosophy, barely connected to physical reality.
    After Galileo, mathematics became the scaffolding
    of physics, and (apparently as a consequence) subject to rapid development.
    This revolution in Galileo's thought, and in the philosophy of
    mathematics more generally, had to come from outside mathematics:
    in Galileo's case it had its roots in literature, the arts, and quite
    possibly the theology of the High Middle Ages.
  • Hodge Theory on Matroids


    Speaker: Eric Katz (Univerisity of Waterloo) - http://www.math.uwaterloo.ca/~eekatz/

    When: Wed, September 9, 2015 - 3:15pm
    Where: Math 3206

    View Abstract

    Abstract: The chromatic polynomial of a graph counts its proper colourings. This polynomial's coefficients were conjectured to form a unimodal sequence by Read in 1968. This conjecture was extended by Rota in his 1970 address to assert the log-concavity of the characteristic polynomial of matroids which are the common generalizations of graphs and linear subspaces. We discuss the resolution of this conjecture which is joint work with Karim Adiprasito and June Huh. The solution draws on ideas from the theory of algebraic varieties, specifically Hodge theory, showing how a question about graph theory leads to a solution involving Grothendieck's standard conjectures.