Description

Simple random sampling. Sampling for proportions. Estimation of sample size. Sampling with varying probabilities. Sampling: stratified, systematic, cluster, double, sequential, incomplete. Also listed as SURV 440.

Prerequisites

STAT 401 or STAT 420

Topics

Basic concepts

Populations, samples, sampling frames.
Sampling design, statistics, bias.
Sampling and nonsampling errors.
(0.5 week)

Simple Random Sampling

Estimates of population mean, total, proportion and variance and their sampling properties.
Confidence limits, use of normal approximation.
Auxiliary information, ratio and regression estimators.
(4.5 weeks)

Stratified Samples

Definitions, weighting and estimators.
Optimal allocation, poststratification.
(2 weeks)

Unbiased Estimation for Cluster and Two-Stage Sampling

Single-stage, two-stage, and multi-stage cluster sampling.
Fixed and random clusters.
With-replacement and without-replacement sampling of PSU's.
Approximate variance estimators.
(4 weeks)

Advanced Topics

Variance estimation, categorical data analysis, regression in complex surveys.

Archives: 2011 | 2012 | 2013 | 2014 | 2015 | 2016

  • Characteristic fast marching method for approximating the viscosity solution of generalized eikonal equation

    Speaker: Daisy Dahiya (UMD) -

    When: Thu, September 15, 2016 - 3:30pm
    Where: MATH0407

    View Abstract

    Abstract: The propagation of a wavefront in an inhomogeneous moving medium is governed by generalized eikonal equation. If the medium of propagation is at rest then the governing equation is the eikonal equation. Fast marching method is a computationally efficient numerical method for approximating the viscosity solution of eikonal equation. But the method fails in a moving medium. In this work we present a generalization of fast marching method for approximating the viscosity solution of generalized eikonal equation.
  • On a Boltzmann mean field model for knowledge growth

    Speaker: Alexander Lorz (Universite Pierre et Marie Curie - Paris 6) - http://www.alexanderlorz.com/

    When: Thu, September 22, 2016 - 3:30pm
    Where: MATH 0407

    View Abstract

    Abstract: We analyze a Boltzmann type mean field game model for knowledge
    growth, which was proposed by Lucas and Moll. We discuss the underlying
    mathematical model, which consists of a coupled system of a Boltzmann type
    equation for the agent density and a Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman equation for the
    optimal strategy. We study the analytic features of each equation separately
    and show local in time existence and uniqueness for the fully coupled system.
    Furthermore we focus on the existence of special solutions,
    which are related to exponential growth in time - so called balanced growth path
    solutions.
    This is joint work with Martin Burger and Marie-Therese Wolfram
  • On the surface signature of internal waves in the ocean

    Speaker: Philippe Guyenne (University of Delaware) - http://www.math.udel.edu/~guyenne/

    When: Thu, October 6, 2016 - 3:30pm
    Where: MATH 0407

    View Abstract

    Abstract: Based on a Hamiltonian formulation of a two-layer ocean, we consider the situation in which internal waves are treated in the long-wave regime while surface waves are described in the modulation regime. We derive an asymptotic model for surface-internal wave interactions, in which the nonlinear internal waves evolve according to a KdV equation while the smaller-amplitude surface waves propagate at a resonant group velocity and their envelope is described by a linear Schrodinger equation.
    In the case of an internal soliton of depression, for small depth and density ratios of the two layers, the Schrodinger equation is shown to be in the semi-classical regime in analogy with quantum mechanics, and thus admits localized bound states. This leads to the phenomenon of trapped surface modes, which propagate as the signature of the internal wave, and thus it is proposed as a possible explanation for bands of surface roughness above internal waves in the ocean.
    Some numerical simulations taking oceanic parameters into account are also performed to illustrate this phenomenon. This is joint work with Walter Craig and Catherine Sulem.

  • Deterministic and stochastic aspects of fluid mixing

    Speaker: Michele Coti Zelati (Department of Mathematics - UMD) - http://www.math.umd.edu/~micotize/

    When: Thu, October 13, 2016 - 3:30pm
    Where: MATH0407

    View Abstract

    Abstract: The process of mixing of a scalar quantity into a homogenous fluid is a familiar physical phenomenon that we experience daily. In applied mathematics, it is also relevant to the theory of hydrodynamic stability at high Reynolds numbers - a theory that dates back to the 1830's and yet only recently developed in a rigorous mathematical setting. In this context, mixing acts to enhance, in certain
    senses, the dissipative forces. Moreover, there is also a transfer of information from large length-scales to small length-scales vaguely analogous to, but much simpler than, that which occurs in turbulence. In this talk, we focus on the study of the implications of these fundamental processes in linear settings, with particular emphasis on the long-time dynamics of deterministic systems (in terms of sharp decay estimates) and their stochastic perturbations (in terms of invariant measures).
  • A Non-local Variational Problem Arising from Studies of Nonlinear Charge Screening in Graphene Monolayers

    Speaker: Cyrill Muratov (New Jersey Institute of Technology) - https://web.njit.edu/~muratov/

    When: Thu, October 20, 2016 - 3:30pm
    Where: MATH 0407

    View Abstract

    Abstract: This talk is concerned with energy minimizers in an orbital-free density functional theory that models the response of massless fermions in a graphene monolayer to an out-of-plane external charge. The considered energy functional generalizes the Thomas-Fermi energy for the charge carriers in graphene layers by incorporating a von-Weizsaecker-like term that penalizes gradients of the charge density. Contrary to the conventional theory, however, the presence of the Dirac cone in the energy spectrum implies that this term should involve a fractional Sobolev norm of the square root of the charge density. We formulate a variational setting in which the proposed energy functional admits minimizers in the presence of an out-of-plane point charge. The associated Euler-Lagrange equation for the charge density is also obtained, and uniqueness, regularity and decay of the minimizers are proved under general conditions. In addition, a bifurcation from zero to non-zero response at a finite threshold value of the external charge is proved. This is joint work with J. Lu (Duke University) and V. Moroz (Swansea University).
  • Zika Virus Dynamics: the Implications of the Sexual Transmission Pathway

    Speaker: Fola B. Agusto (Dept of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology - University of Kansas) - https://sites.google.com/site/agustofb/

    When: Thu, October 27, 2016 - 3:30pm
    Where: MATH 0407
  • Effective models for Ginzburg-Landau vortices

    Speaker: Sylvia Serfaty (Douglis Lecture) (NYU) - http://www.math.nyu.edu/~serfaty/

    When: Wed, November 2, 2016 - 3:15pm
    Where: CSIC 4122

    View Abstract

    Abstract: Ginzburg-Landau type equations are models for superconductivity,
    superfluidity, Bose-Einstein
    condensation. A crucial feature is the presence of quantized vortices, which
    are topological zeroes of the complex-valued solutions. This talk will
    review some results
    on the derivation of effective models to describe the statics and dynamics
    of these vortices,
    with particular attention to the situation where the number of vortices
    blows up with the
    parameters of the problem. In particular we will present new results on
    the derivation of mean field limits
    for the dynamics of many vortices starting from the parabolic
    Ginzburg-Landau equation or
    the Gross-Pitaevskii (=Schrodinger Ginzburg-Landau) equation.
  • Nonlinear Flow in Microfluidic Devices

    Speaker: Kaitlyn Hood (MIT) - http://www.kaitlynhood.com

    When: Thu, November 10, 2016 - 3:30pm
    Where: MATH0407

    View Abstract

    Abstract: Typically, microfluidic devices are modeled by linear PDEs because the length scales and velocity scales are small so that the Reynolds number is close to zero. However, in some medical devices, large flow velocities are used to access nonlinear inertial effects. In this case, the flow is described by the Navier-Stokes equations where the Reynolds number is moderately large, on the order of 10 to 100. I will discuss a mathematical model using numerical methods combined with singularity solutions via perturbation methods. This model reduces computational complexity and produces a scaling law that can be used to design microfluidic devices.

  • On the Musket problem

    Speaker: Robert Strain (University of Pennsylvania) - https://www.math.upenn.edu/~strain/

    When: Thu, November 17, 2016 - 3:30pm
    Where: Kirwan Hall 0407

    View Abstract

    Abstract: The Muskat problem models the dynamics of an interface between two incompressible immiscible fluids with different characteristics, in porous media. The phenomena have been described using the experimental Darcy’s law. Saffman and Taylor (1958) related this problem with the evolution of an interface in a Hele-Shaw cell since both physical scenarios can be modeled analogously. In this talk we will discuss existence results, singularity results, and long time decay behavior of the Muskat problem in 2D and in 3D.
  • PDE models of biological growth

    Speaker: Alberto Bressan (Penn State University) - https://www.math.psu.edu/bressan/

    When: Thu, December 8, 2016 - 3:30pm
    Where: CSIC 4122

    View Abstract

    Abstract: Living tissues, such as stems, leaves and flowers in plants and bones in animals, grow into a great variety of shapes. In some cases, Nature has found ways to control this growth with remarkable accuracy.

    In this talk I shall discuss some free boundary problems modeling controlled growth, namely

    (I) Growth of 1-dimensional curves in R^3 (plant stems), where stabilization
    in the vertical direction is achieved by a feedback response to gravity.

    (II) Growth of 2 or 3-dimensional domains, controlled by the concentration of a morphogen, coupled with the minimization of an elastic deformation energy.

    Some recent existence, uniqueness, and stability results will be presented, together with numerical simulations. Further research directions will be discussed.